A Grand Annual Tasting 2016 full of surprises!

Back from a second year of exploration of the wine planet, suitcases full of bottles –  one more intriguing than the other – we were impatient to share our discoveries with 120 fine wine connoisseurs!

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It was a difficult choice for the selection, with a final list of 35 wines from 14 countries (1). True heart strokes for some wines, nice curiosities coming from climates both extreme and diverse, each wine tasted on June 13, deserves special attention for its quality and unique personality.
To follow is the summary of a tasting far away from the beaten tracks, organized on the beautiful terrace of Duclot-La Vinicole.

(Northern) Europe seduces with the freshness of its wines

A Swedish white wine on top of the ranking, followed by a Belgian wine, was the first highlight of the tasting!
Made from interspecific varieties (cf. PIWI) – 100% Solaris for Hällåkra Vingard in Sweden and 100% Mossiat for the Belgium Château de Bioul – these wines have “seduced with their freshness and surprised with their aromatic potential”. And although these new varieties (still unknown to the general public), can sometimes lack complexity, they could – thanks to their high resistance to cold – rapidly become the future solution for “Northern” climates, where harsh winters and a lack of sunshine make the production of Vitis vinifera wines (very) complicated.

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Speaking about red wines, Slovakia and Austria are two European nations to follow closely. The Slovak “Cuvée 2012” from Mrva & Stanko (made of 4 indigenous varietals: Hron/Vah/Rimava/Rudava) & 100% Blaufraenkisch “Alte Reben 2011” from J. Heinrich have been described as “providing immediate pleasure with a lot of finesse and an elegant and complex tannic structure”.

TOP 5 – WHITE WINES
1 – Sweden : “Solaris 2014“, from Hällåkra Vingård
2 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Muskotály Réserve 2003“, from Château Dereszla
3 – Indonesia (Bali) : “Aga White 2016“, from Hatten Wines
4 – Belgium (Côtes de Sambre et Meuse) : “Mossiat 2014“, from Château de Bioul
5 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Tokaj Szamorodni Sec 2007“, from Samuel Tinon

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Exotic destinations in front of the scene

Who would have believed it?… Two Balinese wines on the podium: undoubtedly the biggest surprise of the tasting!
Imagine Bali (the only wine region of Indonesia): a tropical country where one can harvest up to 3 times a year, where the vineyard has no dormancy period, where it is never less than 23 ° C in winter and where the vines do not live more than 12 years, because of incessant labor…
Yet the wines “made in Bali” have astonished many guests. Described as “very aromatic, pleasant on the palate and with a certain freshness”, these wines showed that with suitable grape varieties (here Belgia and Muscat St Vallier), advanced technology and specific expertise, it is technically possible to make good wines here.

The top 50 studios pics of the tasting !

The top 50 studios pics of the tasting !


As for Brazil, an increasingly recognized destination, with varied climates (equatorial in the north, continental-temperate in the south), it is a country where great “terroirs“ are emerging. As in the Valle dos Vinhedos in the south, where the “Quorum 2006” from Lidio Carraro (40% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Tannat, 15% Cabernet Franc) was unanimously recognized as incredibely elegante.

The production of sparkling wines of high quality is booming worldwide

Germany, England, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Hungary… all these countries have something in common: they play in the big leagues in terms of production of sparkling wines.
Blind tasted around a game that consisted of finding the country of origin (not that easy…), seven sparkling wines, all from different countries, have literally amazed our guests!

JBA with John Leroy, winemaker @ Ruffus Estate (Belgium)

JBA with John Leroy, winemaker @ Ruffus Estate (Belgium)


In fact, more and more wineries, located in regions of the world with suitable terroirs – predominantly calcareous/chalky soils and cool/temperate climates – prove that with suitable varieties, grapes harvested with good maturity, using the traditional method (2) and with long and rigorous ageing, it is possible to produce fantastic bubbles around the world – able to compete with the French production, for example.
Even Bali moved up on the podium with it’s Moscato d’Bali from Sababay, an aromatic and slightly sweet sparkling wine.

TOP 3 – SPARKLING WINES
1-Belgium (Wallonie) : “Cuvée Franco Dragone 2011“, from Ruffus
2 - Brazil (Serra Gaucha) : “Terroir Nature – SAFRA 2009“, from Cave Geisse
3 - Indonesia (Bali) : “Moscato d’Bali 2015“, from Sababay
Special mention : England (Kent) : “Blanc de Blancs 2010“, from Gusbourne

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[NB : congratulations to Paul Dunleavy, from Te Motu (NZ), the only guest at the blind tasting who identified the origins of the 7 sparkling wines!]

Hungary honored and present in all categories

Hungary was in all conversations on 13 June. First with the famous Tokaj region and its sweet wines : 260g of residual sugar for the delicious “Muskotály Réserve 2003“ from Château Dereszla of which remained not a single drop!
But also with dry white wine, like the amazing “Szamorodni Sec 2007” from Samuel Tinon : a wine made from botrytis grapes, fermented in open tanks without residual sugar (unique in the world)… a wine of meditation.

THE TEAM !!

THE TEAM !!


Lesser known than other Hungarian wine regions, Etyek-Buda (25 minutes west of Budapest), with its mild continental climate, turned towards the production of juicy Pinot Noir wines in recent years. A nice example : the “Pinot Noir 2013“ from Etyeki Kuria – n°1 red wine of the tasting. Again, a nice surprise!

TOP 5 – RED WINES
1 - Hungary (Etyek-Buda) : “Pinot Noir 2013“, from Etyeki Kuria
2 - New Zealand (Waiheke Island) : “Bordeaux Blend 1999“, from Te Motu
3 - Australia (Tasmania) : “Cab. Sauvignon/Merlot 2000“, from Freycinet
4 - Brazil (Serra Gaucha) : “Quorum 2006“, from Lidio Carraro
5 – Austria (Burgenland) : “Alte Reben 2011“, from J. Heinrich
Special mention : 
 “Cuvée 2012“, from Mrva & StankoSlovakia

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Oceania never ceases to surprise

We all agree, Australia and New Zealand don’t have to gain one’s spurs.
However, two regions particularly intrigued us by their cool climate, particularly suitable for the production of long ageing “Bordeaux style“ wines:
-Tasmania (South of Australia), with the “Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot 2000“, from Freycinet Winery, a model of elegance and freshness ;
-and Waiheke Island, in New Zealand (near Auckland), where the “Bordeaux Blend 1999” from Te Motu (60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, 10% Cabernet Franc), 2nd on the podium and WINE EXPLORERS’ Heart Stroke, impressed with its vitality and youthfulness.
Finally, our guests said they tasted some of the most finest Syrah from Hawke’s Bay (north of New Zealand), home of real Syrah gems like the great “Jewelstone Syrah 2013” from Mission Estate, as well as from Australia, with  “Syrahmi Dreams… 2012“ from Adam Foster and “Basket Press Shiraz 2011“ from Rockford Wines, without forgetting a legendary Grenache, with “The Tri-Centenary 2008“ from Yalumba.

The wine planet (still) remains to be discovered…

WineExplorers’cheers,
Amandine Fabre & Jean-Baptiste Ancelot

 

Thank you to Jean-Luc Lavatine and the team of Duclot-La Vinicole for having made available this beautiful place for our Annual Tasting.
Thank you to all producers for having participated in this event by offering us the wines. We were also very touched by the presence in Paris, on June 13, of some wineries which came to support the event : Hatten Wines (Bali), Ruffus (Belgium), Sababay (Bali), J. Heinrich (Austria), Te Motu (New Zealand) and the Château de Bioul.
Finally, a huge thank you to everyone who participated in the success of this beautiful evening : Catherine Ancelot-Savignac (who also prepared a wonderful buffet!), Prune Meunier, Ode Coyac, Alexandra Schneider, Clara Laurent, Victory Dauviau ; as well as Amandine Fabre, Ludovic Pollet and Stephane Diné from the WINE Explorers’ team.
 

(1) Complete list of the 35 wines presented on June 13 for the Grand Annual Tasting :
1 – Indonesia (Bali) : “Aga White 2016“, from Hatten Wines – Bali
2 – Belgium (Côtes de Sambre et Meuse) : “Mossiat 2014“, from Château de Bioul
3 – Sweden (Skåne) : “Solaris 2014“, from Hällåkra Vingård
4 – Belgium (Heuvelland) : “Pinot 2015“, from Entre Deux Monts
5 – Switzerland (Mont-sur-Rolle) : “Clos du Couvent 2009“, from Domaine de Maison Blanche
6 – Austria (Wachau) : “Smaragd Singerriedel 2014“, from Domäne Wachau
7 – Czech Republic (Moravia) : “Sonberk Riesling V.O.C. 2013“, from SONBERK
8 – Australia (Eden Valley) : “Heggies Vineyard Riesling 2005“, from Heggies Vineyard (Yalumba)
9 – Germany (Rheingau) : “Riesling Alte Reben QBA trocken 2005“, from SCHLOSS VOLLRADS
10 – Australia (Tasmania) : “Freycinet Riesling 2003“, from Freycinet Vineyard
11 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Furmint Sparkling Wine 2011“, from Gróf Degenfeld
12 – England (Kent) : “Blanc de Blancs 2010“, from Gusbourne
13 – Brazil (Serra Gaucha) : “Terroir Nature – cuvée SAFRA 2009“, from Cave Geisse
14 – Belgium (Wallonie) : “Cuvée Franco Dragone Prestige 2011“, from Ruffus
15 – Germany (Rheingau) : “Riesling Sekt Extra Brut 2003“, from SCHLOSS VOLLRADS
16 – Indonesia (Bali) : “Moscato d’Bali 2015“, from Sababay Winery
17 – Australia (Barossa) : “Sparkling Black Shiraz NV“, from Rockford Wines
18 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Kabar 2013“, from Chateau Dereszla
19 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Tokaj Szamorodni Sec 2007“, from Samuel Tinon
20 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Tokaji Aszú 6 Puttonyos 2008“, from Gróf Degenfeld
21 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Muskotály Réserve 2003“, from Vinotéka Dereszla
22 – Denmark : “Utopia Rondo 2006“, from Kelleris Vin
23 – Austria (Burgenland) : “Alte Reben 2011“, from Weingut Heinrich
24 – Hungary (Sopron) : “Kékfrankos 2013“, from Etyeki Kúria Winery
25 – Austria (Burgenland) : “St. Laurent Schafleiten 2013“, from Judith Beck
26 – Slovakia : “Cuvée 2012 (Hron/Váh/Rimava/Rudava)“, from Víno Mrva & Stanko
27 – Brazil (Serra Gaucha) : “Quorum 2006“, from Lidio Carraro
28 – New Zealand (Waiheke Island) : “Bordeaux Blend 1999“, from Te Motu
29 : Australia (Tasmania) : “Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot 2000“, from Freycinet Winery
30 – Slovakia : “Pinot Noir 2013“, from Víno Tajna
31 – Hungary (Etyek-Buda) : “Pinot Noir 2013“, from Etyeki Kuria Winery
32 – Australia (Barossa) : “Tricentenary Grenache 2008“, from Yalumba
33 – New Zealand (Hawke’s Bay) : “Jewelstone Syrah 2013“, from Mission Estate Winery
34 – Australia (Heathcote) : “Dreams…2012“, from Syrahmi Estate (Adam Foster)
35 – Australia (Barossa) : “Basket Press Shiraz 2011“, from Rockford Wines 

(2) The so-called classic way (though not the oldest) to produce sparkling wine is popularly known as the Champagne method or méthode classique which is the official EU designation. The wine is fermented once in the barrel and then undergoes a second fermentation in the bottle.

Impossible is not a Swedish concept!

Welcoming and friendly people, varied and spectacular landscapes,  generous and sensual cuisine ; how is it possible not to fall in love with Sweden? Personally, we succumbed…

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It is via the Øresund Bridge(1) that we left Denmark, heading to the south of Sweden, where a handful of die-hard winemakers were waiting for us. An enchanting journey in a country with a climate as Nordic as austere, where direct wine sales at the estate is not permitted, where it was forbidden to produce (commercially) until 2000, yet offering (a few) wines like no other.

Hällåkra Vingård, a little paradise

“Maybe we will be able to harvest early November ; if the strong cold spare us this year… of course”. It was with these words that Håkan and Lotta Hansson, owners of the Hällåkra Vingard’s estate welcomed us. A little piece of paradise, home to 6.5 hectares of vines, planted in 2003 on beautiful south-facing slopes.

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We were in the village of Anderslöv, in the south of the country. Håkan grew up here. It is the house of his childhood. “I remember little.  Fetching water from the well. We didn’t have electricity either. Life was good, simple”. After becoming a redoubtable businessman – first as a banker in Stockholm, then as a member of the Swedish government attached to the Ministry of Industry – the midlife crisis of 50-years finally overcame its bureaucratic side. “At the time, I didn’t think for a moment about all the work involved in producing the bottles of wine that I was drinking. Today, it makes me a philosopher”. Adding : “when you have a top job in Sweden, wine is one of the things to know to shine socially, as well as playing golf or hunting”.

It makes him smile now. He received us in shorts, hair in the wind, smiling from ear to ear.

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This return to the earth is a success. And thanks to his sensitivity, and with the expertise of Peter Bo Jorgensen, his winemaker, Håkan produces lovely wines and is constantly creating. Like with his new amphora wine project. A delight.

Some Swedish wines to discover :
-Solaris 2013, from Hällåkra Vingård (100% Solaris)
-Blanc de Blancs Brut 2010 (20% Pinot Auxerrois, 20% Chardonnay, 30% Orillon, 30% Seyval Blanc) from Köpingsberg Vingård
-Per Ols Röa 2013 (80% Rondo, 20% Cabernet Cortis) from Ekesåkra Vingård
-Rondo 2014 from Hällåkra Vingård (100% Rondo)

Products from the forest & Swedish cuisine

But why would one want to make wine in Sweden? Icy winds, early snow, late frosts, long winters and short days… it is hard to find more extreme circumstances. “Swedish wines have managed to create a new identity in terms of “taste”, with a higher acidity and low alcohol degree. The profile is atypical : fresh and very tense, accommodating marvelously the local cuisine!”, Karl Sjöström, the sommelier at Hällåkra Vingard explained.

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Because traditional Swedish cuisine is a clever combination between seafood (its fleshy salmon is a must!) and those of the forest.

To prove it, Lotta Hansson, a genuine hostess – who leads the kitchen with a master hand – took us for a picking in the forest, in order to compose the menu that would be served for lunch… An ancient practice, and a great inspiration to many restaurants. Here as well, Noma(2) makes its market.

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Upon our cheerful return to the estate, basket filled with herbs, plants and all kinds of wild fruit, one more appetizing than the other, it was time for cooking! At noon, Lotta would serve a monkfish fillet with a cranberry white butter, accompanied by mashed potatoes and a homemade chutney. Memorable.

The Systembolaget, the monopoly on wine sales in Sweden

Forget about independent wine shops in Sweden… The retail of wine – and more generally that of alcoholic beverages of more than 3.5 degrees –  is under the exclusive management of the Systembolaget, the state monopoly. Why such control? To curb alcohol consumption(3) (in theory). The rules are strict and not always understood : sale to persons under the age of 20 is prohibited, as is promotional offers and bottles are only sold individually.

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All these constraints – including high taxes on wine – lead many Swedes to buy their wine via the “thirsty drive”, to Germany for the southerners, and to Estonia for those in the east.
Even worse for the few Swedish winemakers is that they are unable to sell their wine directly from the estate… unless they have a restaurant (in which case wine can be sold by the glass). Damn frustrating for the tourists.

“It is very difficult to sell to the final customer”, Claes Olsson and Thorsten Persson, the owners of Ekesåkra Vingard winery told us. After having proved the veracity of their vineyard project to the government (creating a business plan over 6 years!), they now have the right to sell their production to three stores in the south.

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“If I had to start it again, I will never do it”, Claes, a former commercial director for a large US firm, who simply wanted above all to reconnect with his farmer family roots, likes to say.
There are however two positive points regarding the Systembolaget that deserve to be highlighted : the diversity in the supply of wine is superb, and the quality of information available to the consumer, impeccable.

The limits of northern viticulture

“If some have managed to make wine in Denmark, we can succeed in Sweden”, Gabriel, the owner of the (former) Gabriels Vingård estate, used to dream. As builder of green homes, he began this venture in 2007 with 2,000 vines planted in his garden (only white); with a few viticulture and wine books purchased online, as only technical support.

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Located in Yngsjö, south (60km north from the other wineries visited), Gabriels Vingård faces a major problem: it is at the gateway to the Baltic Sea. Result : strong winds throughout the year and late frosts almost every summer (sometimes until June 6!).

During six seasons, with a large dose of perseverance and courage, Gabriel planted, replanted and replanted again the majority of the plants, uprooted or destroyed by the ruthless weather, without ever having been able to do one complete harvest… Just half a harvest in 2011, the birds having spared the remaining grapes. Each year, he said to his wife: “Again. I try again next year. I’ll get there”.

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Until his pragmatism prevailed. He realized that the climate here will never allow him to make wine. “Sometimes you have to resign yourself and stop”, he told us not without some emotion in his voice. A humbling and a rare moment of sharing, savored around delicious tacos cooked by Gabriel. We were kindly invited to join his family for dinner.

Our Swedish trip ended on a sparkling note with Carl-Otto, the owner of Köpingsberg Vingård estate, the only exclusive producer of sparkling wines. A future solution for the production of Swedish wine according to him.

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Because as he rightly summarizes: “the only way to become a winemaker in Sweden one day, is to be above all a dreamer first!”.
To meditate…

WineExplorers’cheers,
JBA

 

 

Thank you to Hällåkra Vingård, Gabriels Vingård, Ekesåkra Vingård and Köpingsberg for their warm welcome. And thank you to Christofer Johansson, Torbjörn Rundqvist and Per Fritzell for their warm invitation to the north of the country to taste ice ciders : we hope to honor it next time we visit Sweden.
 

(1) The Øresund Bridge, 7.8 km long, connects the cities of Malmö in Sweden and Copenhagen in Denmark, for a crossing price of 36€. This bridge is on two levels: on top is the E20 motorway, and on the bottom the railway line.
(2) Noma, two Michelin stars, is a restaurant located in Copenhagen, Denmark. It was ranked “best restaurant in the world” by Restaurant magazine in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2014.
(3) It was in the nineteenth century in Stockholm that Magnus Huss (Swedish doctor) introduced the concept of alcoholism as a disease.

Denmark, a newcomer on the European benches

I am lacking the words to describe the beauty of Denmark.
Upon our arrival, we were moved by its brightly colored landscapes. Its virgin aspect, wild and unspoilt. Its unequaled blue sky.

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Starting in the South, from the Dutch border, we were eager to discover the Danish vineyards, the young student on the European benches.
Because even though the Danish Vineyards Association (1) was created in 1993, it was not until 2000 that Denmark was  (finally) allowed by the EU to produce wine commercially (2).
Today there are a hundred producers. Most wineries are less than 2 hectares in size, producing in difficult conditions. To make a living from this passion remains quite a challenge. The guided tour follows.

Skaersoegaard, a lush green velvet

Nearby Kolding – on Jutland island, West – our journey started with Skaersoegaard estate. Being the second “biggest” Danish winery with 5.5 hectares, Skaersoegaard is a beautiful place to visit urgently.

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Paddle in hand, we were invited to visit the property by boat. Sven Moesgaard, the owner – and one of the pioneers to have planted vines in Denmark – fell in love with this place, largely due to the lake. “Without this body of water, I would never have planted vines; it provides the necessary protection against frost”.

A family of swans were watching us from a certain distance, hidden in the reeds. These are the employees of the winery, Sven laughingly explained : they maintain the vines by eating weeds and feed the soil with their droppings. Effective and free labor!

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The vineyard tour over, it was time for fishing on the lake for Ludo and for a nap in the shade of a tree for me. We were happily awaiting the evening BBQ at the water’s edge, in which a thousand pinecones would flame and crackle, to our greatest delight.

Not easy to be winemaker in Denmark

However, why plant vines in Denmark, where the climatic conditions are cold and the period of sunshine very short? “By challenge! “, Sven, who was an engineer in the pharmaceutical industry, before becoming a winemaker, said. “People have always thought it was impossible to plant vines and to make wine in Denmark…and I hate what is impossible”.

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As a result, you can find on Skaersoegaard estate – as elsewhere in Denmark – exclusively interspecific varieties (like Solaris, Rondo, Orion, Regent, Ortega, Cabernet Cortis, etc.), which have the advantage of being more resistant to vine diseases (powdery mildew, downy mildew), often with earlier maturities. And it works pretty well. Fortunately. Because vine treatments are banned by the Danish government (only three soft sprays are allowed) and the challenge of maintaining the vines in good condition is huge.

In addition to this, draconian hygienic standards are imposed by the government.

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Danish growers are not only forced to wear a full protective suit and overshoes to access their cellar, but also to have a “white” room, isolated from the rest of the buildings, washable from the floor to the ceiling, for cleaning technical equipment. What a surprise the first time we saw it… It’s (almost) like a hospital room. And attention to regular controls! “If these standards were applied to older wine countries, the majority of wineries in the world would have to close their doors”, Sven laughingly added.
To boot the government doesn’t provide any funding for this new business, which is for now judged as unprofitable. “No matter, the wine is primarily a story of passion”.

A night on Samsø island

Having left Skaersoegaard estate in the afternoon, we had to rally Rёsnes peninsula, East (on Sealand), where we were expected for our second visit. And it seemed that on this day the GPS of the Wine Explorers’ Truck  decided to play some tricks on us.

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Forgetting that the “shortest route” selection had been checked in the GPS, we naively followed it. After barely 20km, we were already facing the sea, in front of a ferry terminal. Amused by the idea of a boat crossing, we quickly forgave our guide.

A first stop halfway forced us to land on Samsø, an island of 100 square km and 3,700 inhabitants – and 100% energy independent and renewable (3). The place is bucolic. The inhabitants live in tune with the rhythm of the sea and the seasons. Everything is so quiet that no ferry will sail in the evening. We decided to spend the night on the island and to leave the next morning at dawn.

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We had the perfect excuse to stay a little longer.  The scenery immediately gave us the feeling of having arrived at the end of the world. We savored the moment with relish. This night, the undertow of the waves would be our lullaby.
Would we continue our journey the next day?…

Dyrehøj Vingaard, the vineyard on the peninsula

Freshly disembarked from the ferry and not yet fully recovered from our emotions, we headed towards Dyrehøj Vingaard, the largest Danish winery. A 8-hectares vineyard literally plunging into the sea. Denmark is definitely full of landscapes one more picturesque than the other.

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We met with Betina and Tom Newberry, brother-sister-farmers, who specialized in the breeding of pigs for a long time. A few years ago, they left everything behind to embark on a wine adventure, focusing on a strategy around oenotourism. The Rёsnes peninsula remains a must in terms of Danish tourism.
And fortunately, the place has a wonderful microclimate for making wine : the sunlight off the water is so particular that its brightness is reflected on the vine with a mirror effect, helping the grapes to mature.

Some Danish wines to discover:
-DON’s Cuvée Brut 2013, from Skaersoegaard (60% Solaris, 40% Orion)
-RÖS Muscaris 2014, from Dyrehøj (90% Muscaris, 10% Solaris)
-Utopia Rondo 2006, from Kelleris Vingård (100% Rondo, aged 9 months in new Hungarian oak)
-Utopia Cougar Rondo 2009, from Kelleris Vingård (100% Rondo, aged 22 months in new French casks)
-Hedvin 2010, from Skaersoegaard (blend of Rondo, Régent, Léon Millot and Cabernet Cortis), a fortified wine (4) with notes of cooked black fruit.

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Kelleris Vingård, the most bordelais of Danish vineyards

After a (fresh!) morning swim in the Øresund strait, facing Sweden, we took the direction of Kelleris Vingård, two kilometers away from the sea, where the owners, Susanne and Søren Hartvig Jensen, a lovely couple, were going to host us.
Søren is a winegrower like no other. He was told repeatedly that Denmark is not a country suited for producing red wine!

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However…With a lot of courage and a touch of craziness, he bet on a production mainly focused on the blue Rondo variety. “I’m not a little crazy, but completely crazy for wanting to specialize in red wines! As consumers like red wines with a long barrel aging, the challenge to make such wine was fun!”.

An unconditional fan of Bordeaux, Søren even added two round towers to his home, to give his estate a castle-like touch – and built a vaulted cellar in order to store his barrels.
He also planted a few plants of Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir on an experimental basis and confessed with a smile that in 10 years, none of them have ever reached maturity. A great illustration of how the Danish climate is complex! “Let us not forget that only 12,000 years ago, there were still 3,000 meters of ice in Denmark”.

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We ended the trip with a meeting with Søren’s friend Jean Becker, former president of the Danish Vineyards Association. He explained that mutual aid between wineries is still difficult in the country, probably due to a lack of knowledge and feedback regarding viticulture at the moment.

Denmark remains to this day a newborn throughout the history of wine, with the future ahead.

WineExplorers’cheers,
JBA

Thank you to Skaersoegaard, Dyrehøj Vingaard and Kelleris Vingård for their warm welcome. And thank you to the French Embassy in Denmark and especially to Raphael Caron, for having advised and guided us in our research. Finally, thank you to Jean Becker for having accepted an interview for the Wine Explorers’ project.

(1) Danish Vineyards Association (DVA)
(2) Along with Sweden and England
(3) For more information about Samsø : http://www.euractiv.fr/sections/energie/samso-lile-100-renouvelable-et-energetiquement-independante-312971
(4) A fortified wine is a wine whose alcohol content is increased and the fermentation stopped by adding alcohol in order to retain residual sugars.

The Netherlands, a thousand years of viticulture

Barely out of Belgium, we headed towards the Netherlands for the continuation of our European tour. Until then, I only knew this country for its delicious cheeses – such as Gouda, Edam and Maasdam – but I had never heard of Dutch wine !

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Yet, the country has 176 winegrowers for 250 hectares of vines. A micro-production full of surprises which reveals some very nice wines.

And why not us?!

Although Dutch wine history dates back to the year 968 (the region was then at the heart of the Franc Empire), modern viticulture only appeared in the early 1970’s. At that time, experiments were done in Belgium, just on the other side of the border. “Why not us?!” the Dutch then asked. It also seems that Al Gore’s speech on global warming issued in 1992, finally convinced skeptics to embrace the adventure…

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However, making wine in Holland remains a big challenge since a third of the country is situated below sea level. To gain a better understanding, we decided to start with Neimburg, in the south of the country, which with 85 hectares of vineyards, is the largest wine region of the Netherlands.

Domein Wijngaarsberg, pragmatism above all

It is sometimes said that the Dutch have a cold character. This is not true. However, they are very pragmatic.  We met with Jules Nijst, the winemaker and owner of Domein Wijngaarsberg. After working for large groups such as Phillips and Vodafone he decided to leave everything behind to be closer to nature.

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In 2006, Jules had the opportunity to buy a vineyard planted four years earlier by a couple of neighbouring farmers ; as they couldn’t manage the vineyard in addition to their dairy operations.

Curious, I asked Jules what motivated him to endorse the winemaker cap. « I didn’t choose this profession for the money but for the joy of creating something ». He added humorously : « The only way to be rich when starting a winery, is to start very rich ». One needs passion, a touch of positive craziness… and a lot of pragmatism !

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On this particular day, his son and some friends from high school came to lend a hand. Why ? To remove half of the clusters in the vineyard ! A daunting task on the 3 hectares planted with Pinot Gris, Auxerrois, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, but worth it : this action reduces the risk of botrytis by 80%, and improves the concentration of the remaining grapes.

For Jules, the most enjoyable part of being a winemaker is to find the right balance between free entreprise on the one side and obligations to the nature on the other. « Man directs the vine in winter; the vine directs man in summer »…

A picnic in the vineyard ?

Next stop Erichem village, in the heart of the Netherlands, where we have an appointment with Diederik Beker, the owner and winemaker of Betuws Wijndomein. Always fascinated by nature, he explained to us how he was able to combine both the development of wine tourism and biodiversity conservation in his vineyard.

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Because with 6 hectares of vines, Betuws Wijndomein is part of the “big” estates of the country and attracts many tourists.

But then, it is not always easy having your production known (or recognized) being an emerging wine country. Diedrich’s strategy is simple : highlighting nature while offering tourists the opportunity to stop and contemplate it – like with picnics in the vineyard. « I don’t want to compete with French, Italian and New Zealand wines, Dutch wines are too expensive due to their low production. So we need other ways to attract people ; like wine tourism ».

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Some Dutch wines to discover :
-Chardonnay 2012, from Domein de Wijngaardsberg
-Müller Thurgau 2013, from Wijngoed Fromberg
-Linge Wit 2014, from Betuws Wijndomein (100% Johanniter)
-Pinot Noir 2012, from Domein de Wijngaardsberg
-Pinot Noir 2013, from Wijngoed Fromberg

Wijngoed Fromberg, a promising wine estate

The alert was raised in late August 2013 : a new invasive species was attacking the early ripening red varieties ! This Asian insect, the suzukii fly’s (1) particularity is to spawn in fleshy fruits (cherries, grapes…) on which the larva feeds, causing substantial production losses.

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And for now there is no treatment, we were told at Wijngoed Fromberg. Last year, a third of the harvest on this magnificent 3-hectare vineyard was lost. To watch closely this year…

On the wine side, the estate is very interesting.  Carmen and her husband Marcel are the current owners. The vineyard, which was planted in 1991 by Carmen’s father, is situated on very poor limestone soils.

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Respecting nature, perches for eagles are installed on every corner of the field. Why ? “This is the best protection to scare the birds that come to attack the vineyards in summer.”
And when asking Marcel about his greatest satisfaction as a winemaker, please don’t talk to him about medals! “I don’t like medals nor trophies or contests. My best satisfaction is when I’m out of stock !”.

Upon our departure, we came face to face with a beautiful antique windmill, restored by a passionate individual. While we were in contemplation, the owner of the place invited us to climb and visit it.

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We learned to unfold the sails and playing with the wind took us back to childhood…

WineExplorers’cheers,
JBA

 

Thank you to Domein de Wijngaarsberg, Wijngoed Fromberg and Betuws Wijndomein for their warm welcome. And thank you to Gerda Beziade, Xavier Kat and Lars Daniëls, for their advise and guidance  in our research of Dutch wineries.

(1) The “suzukii fly”, also known as Drosophila suzukii, Asian gnat or spotted wing drosophila, is a Diptera insect species of the Drosophilidae family. This invasive species has also appeared fairly recently in northern and eastern France (Paris basin, Picardie, Lorraine, Alsace), where it caused significant damage, especially in the strawberry fields. It is also widely spread throughout Germany and since last year in the Belgian vineyards.

Belgium, a story of friends

Did you know that about thirty wineries are fighting to make their 230 hectares of vines a recognized production in the paradise of good beer and fries? The  vineyard surface area in Belgium is tiny!

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And as the proverb says : ‘everything small is nice’. It’s true, we made friends all the way throughout our trip. All the wineries and all the people that we met during our stay had huge hearts. That’s typical of Belgium, genuine people! Atmosphere and results guaranteed.
Freshly landed in England, we crossed the north of France in order to reach Belgium via Heuvelland.

Entre-Deux-Monts, a family story

The Franco-Belgian border just crossed, a sign indicated the presence of a winery. Yes, Entre-Deux-Monts estate is just 500 meters close to the French border! It owes its name to the two mountains that surround it : the Mont Noir, on the French side and the Mont Rouge, on the Belgian side.

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With their young 13-hectare vineyard planted in 2004, Entre-Deux-Monts is already a great family story. Three generations are involved in it, Martin Bacquaert explained. « My grandfather owns the land. My father helps me to realize my dream and oversees the business. And I am the young winemaker ». Beneath the watchful eye of his mother, of course.

With poor soils mainly composed of limonite (sandy-loamy compacted rocks with iron), the area offers a beautiful production of white wines.

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You can also admire the vineyard from the air via the cable connecting the two mountains. A good opportunity to enjoy some altitude and film an interview with Martin. Normally closed that morning, Regine Becket and Johan Gheysens, Cordoba chairlift owners, put the machine on just for us ; so that we could do the interview. A beautiful gift to Ludo and I, because on this Thursday, July 16, it was our joint birthdays (1)!

Ruffus, the great Belgian bubble

If someone had told me that Belgium have great bubbles other than its Trappist beers, I wouldn’t have believed it. Big mistake… Run to enjoy those of Ruffus estate (2)! Specializing in traditional method sparkling wines, this 20 hectares south facing vineyard, has a superb terroir for the production of fine bubbles.

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And it works well, John Leroy explained. « Almost all of our wines are pre-sold a year in advance ». The cuvée Franco Dragone 2011 (a blend of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier) is of exceptional finesse.
Why such a success ? Very pure chalk soils, only Champagne grape varieties (3) used and long aging are the secrets of their success. « Belgians like minerality in sparkling wines, and ours are full of it », John said.

The man is a phenomenon! As soon as the tasting was completed, John took us to the city of Binche for lunch, with our friend Stéphane, who traveled from Paris just to meet with us.

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Friendship is beautiful! The opportunity to taste some Belgian beers (an anniversary requires this), with a special mention of Orval.
Then, a game of pétanque followed in front of the frenzied brand new winery as did the victory of team Stéphane-JB against John-Ludo duo. Don’t mess with pétanque… or with aniseed beverages for that matter. John had warned us that a birthday must be celebrated like that, or not at all!

Château de Bioul, made with love

When a couple of squires – Andy and Vanessa Wyckmans – decided to turn the family castle into a 10 hectare vineyard, they embarked on a crazy adventure together. Their only weapons being energy and determination which force respect.

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« We had to learn everything from scratch : from planting to farming, through the choice of varietals, winemaking, bottling, marketing and sales », Andy explained. Besides that, they also had to convert some existing buildings, like the winery (an old hay barn). « At first everyone thought we were crazy ; my parents first most! », Vanessa laughed.

The Château de Bioul, which released its first vintage in 2012, can now build its reputation. And the estate’s philosophy does not stop there : creation of lost gardens, cabanas for insects, hedgerows, hives for bees and houses for bats, all around the vineyard. The preservation of biodiversity is one of the primary motivations of this couple of young winemakers.

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In the evening, Andy and Vanessa entrusted the keys of the château to us, so that we could park the WINE Explorers’ truck there. That night, we were the guardians of the place!

Some examples of delicious Belgian wines (a climate succeeding primarily in the production of white wines) :
-Pinot Gris 2014, from Entre-Deux-Monts
-Mossiat 2014, from Château de Bioul (100% Brönner (4))
-Blanc de Blancs NM, from Ruffus
-Bacquaert Brut NM, from Entre-Deux-Monts (90% Chardonnay, 10% Pinot Noir)
-Butte aux lièvres 2007, from Domaine viticole du Chenoy (70% Régent (4), 30% Rondo (4))

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Domaine viticole du Chenoy, PIWI’s or nothing

At the age of 60, Philippe Grafé decided to realize his lifelong dream : to become a winemaker. The best way, according to him to “sink a happy retirement”. Except that making wine takes (a lot of) time. Now 78 years old and full of energy, Philippe admits that « it is impossible to turn back when you start creating a winery project, and that’s good; although it’s still quite a challenge! ». He added with humor: « all is well this morning, I’m not in the obituary column! ».

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As a fervent defender of PIWI grapes (5) (otherwise known as interspecific varieties), Philippe strongly believes in these new varieties, resistant to cold, moisture and a number of fungal diseases (6).
“This is the future”, he explained : my vineyard requires four to five times less treatment compaired to a vineyard planted with traditional varieties.
These new varieties with some complex names : Solaris, Johanniter, Cabernet Blanc, Brönner or Merzling for whites ; Rondo, Regent, Pinotin, Cabertin or Blue Muscat for reds (4) were a real discovery for us.
More and more wineries – like here at the Domaine viticole du Chenoy, or the Château de Bioul and in most of the Nordic countries (where the climate is colder) – are now fully planted with PIWI grapes.

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The taste of these wines, however, seems irregular. Many wonder: can “great” wines be produced from these grapes? Maybe. Not sure. Anyway, the use of these varieties is very recent. And although continuous research is being done (7) , we still lack much feedback on the subject. The debate is open.

As for us, we were off to Mons – the European Capital of Culture 2015 – for a memorable birthday weekend of a camping, where Ludo’s friends joined us for the occasion. The party could begin. 

WineExplorers’cheers,
JBA

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Thank you to Entre-deux-Monts, Domaine viticole du Chenoy, Château de Bioul and Ruffus estates for their warm welcome. Thank you to the Cordoba company for switching the machine on just for us. Thank you to Boschman and Christophe Heynen for having advised and guided us in our research of Belgian domains. Thank you to Chai & Bar in Brussels for their support of the project since the beginning of the adventure. Finally, a huge thank you to our friends Stephane Diné, Alain 2015 and Jérome Dieval for making the trip to Belgium to come and enjoy a few drinks with us for a memorable birthday weekend.

(1) Ludo and I are both born on July 16. Remember last year, we celebrated the event on top of the Great Wall of China.
(2) Ruffus is also known under the name Domaine des Agaisses
(3) Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier.
(4) For more information on these varieties and the PIWI in general: http://www.piwi-international.de/en/information-en.html
(5) PIWI comes from the German « PILZWIDERSTANDSFÄHIGE REBSORTEN », which literally means “vine varieties resistant to fungi”. They were created by crossing European varieties and American fungal resistant varieties. They belong to the type Vitis vinifera, as they are not to be distinguish from a taxonomically point of view (classification of species).
(6) The fungal diseases are usually caused by fungi that attack different species is the green organs of the vine (leaves, twigs, grapes) or trunk; the best known being downy mildew, powdery mildew, Esca, gray mold or the black rot.
(7) For more information, cf. Geisenheim Institute : www.hs-geisenheim.de/


For a tour at Entre-Deux-Monts winery and the region from the air: http://www.heuvelland.be/tourisme/847-www/227-www/606-www.html

England, (a new) kingdom for sparkling wines

Three months were needed for the financing and preparation of the WINE Explorers’ Truck, our new companion. Suffice to say that we were impatient to hit the road again. What a thrilling experience to be able to explore the European vineyards freely!
With an average rate of twelve days per country explored, this vehicle was to be both a customized means of transport as well as an essential working tool for the project.

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Our “coach-home-office” ready, we were off to England for the launch of the European tour, with a ferry baptism between Calais and Dover, as a bonus.

A wine history of 2000 years old

Did you know? The history of English wine dates back more than 2000 years (1)! Yet, “modern viticulture” did not appear in England until after the Second World War, under the leadership of Ray Barrington Brock.

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Even though England had always been a country of  connoisseurs (the pioneers in the importation of the famous “Claret” (2) since the twelfth century), the quality of the wines at that time were not yet sufficient, we must admit.

It’s the opposite now. With 135 wineries for less than 2000 hectares of vines (3) (the vineyard area has literally doubled in the last seven years) and some 6.3 million bottles produced in 2014, England has turned to premium wines. And with 70% of the wines produced being sparkling wines, one can clearly say that it sparkles in every way!

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Curious to better understand this phenomenon – and the global buzz that English wines make today – we decided to visit the South, between the counties of Hampshire and West Sussex ; where viticulture would be born.

A similar climate to Champagne

After disembarking from the ferry under a fine rain (and big gray clouds!), we headed to Exton Park, a relatively new estate in the heart of the South Downs, in the Meon Valley. A site where the terroir seems to speak for itself.

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“Our vineyard is the dream of every viticulturist. Mainly composed of chalk soils similar to those of the Champagne region, it offers a great variety of sites on the same field”, said Fred Langdale, the vineyard manager.
Best of all, it seems that Southern England has a similar climate to that of the Champagne region 15 years ago. All professionals whom we met were unanimous. An effect of global warming? Who knows… The fact is that the bubbles that we had the chance to taste… literally blew our minds.

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“There is something very special at Exton Park, as elsewhere in the South of England – that contributes to making some of the best sparkling wines”, according to Corinne Seely (4), the winemaker.

Some great sparkling wines to taste urgently :
-La Perfide Blanc de Blancs 2009 from Coates & Seely : what finesse !
-Blanc de Blancs 2010 from Gusbourne
-Rosé NV from Exton Park (70% Pinot Noir, 30% Pinot Meunier 30%)
-Brut NV from Coates & Seely (65% Chardonnay, 35% Pinot Noir)
-Brut Reserve 2010 from Gusbourne (68% Chardonnay, 22% Pinot Noir, 10% Pinot Meunier)

Britagne, the «Britannique Méthode»

Our second stop took us to Coates & Seely, only 1h30 drive from London. This 12 hectare estate, mainly planted with Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, was born from a beautiful friendship story between Nicholas Coates, a former London banker – now converted into a passionate winemaker – and Christian Seely, managing director of AXA Millésimes ; two longtime companions.

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It was during a dinner at Château Pichon-Longueville, in 2007, that these two men took the leap. “Christian already had a business plan in mind”, Nicholas explained.
Around Christmas 2008, and after eight months of research, Nicholas found a vineyard less than 2 miles away from his home. The Coates & Seely’s adventure could begin. Both men had the same goal: to produce sparkling wines that draw both on the tradition of 300 years of great champenoise winemaking methods, while remaining proudly British (5).

At lunch, Nicholas told us the fun story of  the “Britannique  Method”, otherwise marketed ‘Britagne’. An acronym from the words “British” and “Champagne”, well reflecting the humor of our British friends.

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After all, what is best : to make “a French quality sparkling wine” or a wine of “Champagne” wine ?, Nicholas asked us.
“A number of English sparkling wines regularly beat French wines in blind tastings. It was time to invent a generic word for our own English sparkling”, he added, smiling.
The friendly (and eternal) rivalry between the French and the English do not only touch on rugby. And that’s fair !

Gusbourne Estate, a well assumed ambition

“Producing the best sparkling wines in the world”, is the ambition of Andrew Weeber, the founder of Gusbourne, an estate created in 2004.

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With the expertise of key people such as Ben Walgate (managing director), Charlie Holland (oenologist), and Laura Rhys MS (in charge of sales and who joined the team earlier this year), Gusbourne is on track to play in the big leagues. “Although we must be patient”, Ben admitted, since a lot of the vines are still very young. Stay closely tuned, the beginning is already very promising…

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We ended the trip with a dinner at Ben’s place. His wife Emy prepared a delicious chili with homemade guacamole. We ate outside around the fire at the end of their garden, enjoying some ‘local craft beers’… once did not hurt. After dinner, we headed to the village pub for one last pint. A must practice! “All of the villages in England has at least one pub”, Ben said.

An opportunity to remember that although sparkling wines are more than ever at the heart of the debate, Britain first remains the kingdom of beer.

WineExplorers’cheers,
JBA

 

Thank you to Exton Park, Coates & Seely and Gusbourne estates for their warm welcome. Thank you to Gérard Basset for his valuable recommendations of wineries to visit. Thank you to Laura Rhys for having shared her precious wine knowledges with us.
Finally, thank you to all of you who participated in the financing of the WINE Explorers’ Truck : the VIDELOT group, Chateau Calon Segur, Chateau Lafon-Rochet, Chateau La Conseillante and all the friends and relatives of the project to who we will offer some well-deserved rewards once the project is completed.

(1) Archaeological excavations have revealed amphoras and bronze cups of wine dating from the 1st century BC in southern England.
(2) The famous “French Claret” imported since the twelfth century under the leadership of Henry II – King of England, are wines of a light red color, ranging from a color similar to that of burgundy  to that of a rosé. They have made the fortune of Bordeaux at the time.
(3) There are actually 135 wineries in the country, for 470 vineyards and 1,884 hectares under vine.
(4) Corinne Seely is a brilliant winemaker, who first started winemaking at Chateau Lynch Bages, where she was part of the team that created the first white wine from this estate, before becoming the oenologist at the Domaine de Chevalier, one of the most beautiful vineyards of Bordeaux for white wines.
(5) An English sparkling wine that is named “Britagne” must at least be made from Pinot noir, Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay,  have its second fermentation in bottle (plus a number of other wine growing and winemaking techniques that must be strictly adhered to). These wines will therefore be designated as made according to the “Britannique Method”.


For more information on English wines : http://www.englishwineproducers.co.uk

Bali, escape warranty

During my studies in Bordeaux, I remember having heard at a tasting that wine is produced in Bali. « Impossible! », I said at the time, the location is too wet. However…

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The “Island of the Gods” as it is nicknamed, is not only a fantastic world known tourist destination. It can also reveal very nice wine surprises. So we were off for a week of unprecedented exploration with some holiday tunes… to our delight!

A vineyard of extreme weather conditions

Imagine : a tropical country where one can harvest up to 3 times a year, where the vineyard has no dormancy period, where it is never less than 23 ° C in winter and where the vines do not live more than 12 years, because of incessant labor… Welcome to Bali, the only wine region of Indonesia!

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And although its history is young, since it began in 1994 with Hatten Wines ; the wine “made in Bali” really exist!
But then the question arrises, why would one make wine in such conditions? « Firstly, because importing wine is complex in Indonesia. And above all because tourists want to taste local wines when they are in Bali », James Kalleske (1), the oenologist of Hatten Wines explained.

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And one has to admit that the quality of Balinese wines is undeniable. « Quality is no longer a question in 2015 ; the wines are technically well made. It is rather a matter of acceptance of the taste of our wines because the grape varieties are different, as Belgia », added Maryse LaRocque (2), in charge of Hatten’s development.

Some nice Balinese wines to discover during your holidays :
-Moscato d’Bali from Sababay Winery (100% Muscat de Saint Vallier (3))
-Aga White NM (100% Belgia) from Hatten Wines
-White Velvet from Sababay Winery (100% Muscat de Saint Vallier)
-Pino de Bali from Hatten Wines (60% Belgia, 40% Alphonse Lavallé ; aged 5 years in Solera (4))

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Sababay Winery, the new Balinese estate

Started only five years ago, Sababay Winery is both a childhood dream and a citizens’ initiative for Evy Gozali. « We chose to work with local farmers by purchasing their grapes, in order to allow them to have a better living », Evy said.
How? By buying their production at 5,000 rupees per kilogram (against 500 rupees in the past) and by setting up aids so that the children can attend school.

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In the interests of organic development, farmers are also required to have at least one cow per vineyard for the production of compost.
A nice philosophy when bearing the fragility of the Balinese ecosystem in mind. Because even though Bali evokes primarily images of landscapes worthy of the most beautiful postcards – white sanded beaches, volcanic reliefs covered by forests or hillside rice fields – let’s not forget that many Balinese are still living in precarious conditions.

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Anecdotally, some farmers with whom Sababay Winery works are Muslims (5) who cultivate the vines without knowing the final product, since they do not drink wine! It is therefore difficult for them to understand that the grapes should not be grown to optimize quantity, as with table grapes. « The trick: make them taste the grape juice samples », Evy said. And it works !

Being part of Nyepi

Nyepi, a beautiful and moving celebration which we will not forget any time soon. Also called “Hindu Day of Silence”, Nyepi is the Balinese New Year.

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Once a year, people have to chase the evil spirits away. And fortunately, we had the opportunity to be part of the celebrations. Huge statues were adorned with monstrous deities (ogoh-ogoh), one more decadent and terrifying than the other, paraded in the streets of Bali at night to the sound of traditional drums. This was followed by a long procession on the beach, where the ogoh-ogoh were decapitated and burned in huge bonfires.

Then came Nyepi. A recollection day where everyone was invited to stay at home. Quietly, in silence and in darkness ; for 24 hours from daybreak. The demons should not be tempted by the return of humans…

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As for us, we took the opportunity to take a break for one day, enjoying the ouside pool at Brown Feather Hotel.

Morning visit of the vineyards

The next day, a driver picked us up before sunrise. We went to visit one of Hatten’s vineyards. Bali was still asleep. It was dark night and the atmosphere slightly mystical. Not a soul in the streets, with the exception of a few tribes of macaques crabbers (6).

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The moment was surreal in comparison to the incessant traffic density that prevails here the other 364 days of the year.
It was 7am when we got there. The sun was just rising. Yet it was already 28 ° C and 100% humidity in the air! The vineyards were beautiful and so green. Here vines don’t lose their leaves… After harvest, a small green cut is done and the vines grow again immediately (7)! Enough to make your head spin.

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We ended the trip with a superb tour of the Bali Safari & Marine Park, it was time to make friends with an orangutan and to admire the spectacular “Bali Agung show”, a life-size show explaining the history of the island…breathtaking.

 

WineExplorers’cheers,
JBA

 

Thank you to Sababay Winery and Hatten Wines for their warm welcome, as well as Brown Feather Hotel and Plataran Ubud for the great accommodation that was offered to us. Thank you especially to Evy Gozali from Sababay Winery and to Maryse LaRocque from Hatten Wines, for their assistance in organizing our stay. Finally, thank you to Ibu Yoke for letting us visit the Bali Safari & Marine Park from the sidelines.
 

(1) James Kalleske, oenologist of Hatten Wines, is the nephew of our friend David Kalleske (domain Rockford Wines, Barossa). The world of wine is decidedly microscopic!
(2) Maryse LaRocque is also the secretary of the Asian Wine Producers Association ; association in partnership with Denis Gastin.
 (3) Muscat de Saint Vallier : interspecific crossing obtained by Seyve-Villard, between « 12 129 Seyve-Villard » and « panse précoce de Provence ».
(4) The solera is a wine aging system used in Spain.
(5) There would be 5% Muslims in Bali
(6) The macaque crabier is a catarhinien monkey native to Southeast Asia and very prevalent on the island of Bali…
(7) A lot of foliage is kept for better photosynthesis, resulting in more tannins and better concentration.

New Zealand, a (green) world apart

Ludo has been talking non-stop about New Zealand for two years… This is his third ‘heart’ homeland where he took some of his most beautiful visual pictures in the past. So I was impatient to go there. Not (only) to be left in peace, be sure.

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We decided to innovate our method of transport by renting a car with an integrated tent on the roof. The concept seemed both friendly and exciting.  We could sleep wherever we wanted without the limitations inherent to the much bigger campervan. Watch in hand, the tent unfolds and installs in less than a minute. We were well on our way…

Organic and biodynamic cultures on the rise

We started our journey on the South Island, rallying Picton by ferry.

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Upon our arrival, we were struck by the preservation of nature and the will of many estates to cultivate the vineyards biodynamically. 
At Seresin Estate, fully organic and biodynamic certified, we enjoyed a beautiful carriage ride through the vineyards to discover with surprise and wonder chickens, sheep, cows and even a few pigs, lounging at their own pace between rows of vines. They provide the best possible compost to the soil, while cleaning weeds. A true work of craftsmanship, 100% green!

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At Felton Road, further south, biodynamic preparations have names similar to Harry Potter’s potions : “Horn Manure”, “Horn Silica”, or “Preparation 507″. « These are essential elements in soil reinforcement  which are the foundation of biodynamics », said Blair, the oenologist. Even eggshells are kept for the vigor of the vineyard, since they are full of calcium! To our delight, Blair gave us 6 freshly laid eggs. The evening’s omelet looked royal.

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As for Waimea, in Richmond, it is the grape skins which are stored for the winter compost.
A green wind breath on New Zealand and we love it. By 2020, the government would even like 20% of wineries to be certified organic (1). To follow closely.

Central Otago, a unique terroir on the 45th parallel

Ludo was right, this country is full of landscapes one more beautiful than the other. Central Otago, the only continental climate of New Zealand (as it is located along the 45th parallel south) (2), remains for me the craziest place we visited in the country.

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Rippon Vineyard is the perfect illustration. Surrounded by the Glendhu Bay mountains and plunging into Lake Wanaka, it is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful vineyards we have visited so far. After a meeting at dawn with employees, Nick – the oenologist of the family estate – explained the terroir of the place to us from his Honda motorcycle. « Schist is the base rock of Central Otago, complemented with greywacke and clay, offering very complex soils. And to complete the picture, anabatic winds (3) from the lake bring cool air to the vineyard, making it a more temperate environment». Grape varieties such as Riesling and Pinot Noir seem to give the best results here. Whilst Nick spent many years studying and working in Burgundy, including a stint at DRC (4), he says, « The work we do at Rippon is based on what we learn from the land itself ».

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We must however be careful and learn how to listen to the weather in Central Otago. Because in this region, « the climate can be extreme, with temperatures easily reaching 38 to 40 ° C in summer, contrasted by strong frost and snow in winter », we were told at Peregrine Estate, a nearby and very talented winery.

Some coups de cœur for this first part of the trip :
-MARAMA 2012, from Seresin Estate (100% Sauvignon Blanc)
-« Block 3 » 2013, from Felton Road (100% Pinot Noir)
-Emma’s Block 2012, from Rippon Vineyard (100% Pinot Noir)
-Pinnacle 2012, from Peregrine Estate (100% Pinot Noir)
-Trev’s Red 2013, from Waimea (71% Cabernet Franc, 27% Syrah, 2% Viognier)

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Sauvignon Blanc, fish and the ocean

Our tour on the South Island ended in the East. We drove along the Pacific Ocean from Pegasus Bay. During  a break in Kaikoura, we met a few sea lions basking from the sun on the rocks. The current passed well and we sympathized immediately.

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Reluctantly leaving our charming companions, we headed to Cloudy Bay – in the Marlborough region – where a great wine tasting accompanied by Bay oysters was waiting us. Small, fleshy and gently iodine, these oysters with nutty flavors went great with the citrus notes of the Sauvignon Blanc from the estate.
The diversity of crustaceans and fish from the bay leaves one dreaming. Stop for example at Rock Ferry estate, a few streets down and let yourself be seduced by a tarakihi (5) with toasted sesame grains on the skin for lunch. Splendid. 

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Before leaving, we headed to Clos Henri. This young domain was created by the Bourgeois family (Domaine Bourgeois in Sancerre).  We liked the place for the willingness of its owners to find a second terroir of expression for Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir that could echo that of Sancerre. Mission accomplished: the wines are pure, racy and of great finesse.

A must detour through the North Island

Less known than other New Zealand wine regions, Wairarapa is full of many small producers who deserve attention. We met David Boyd, the owner of Lynfer Estate. He arrived in New Zealand 26 years ago persuing a military career and nothing predestined him to become a winemaker. That was until he learned that one of his colleagues had bought a domain. “Why not me?”, he said. A dream which came true in 2009.

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Today, the army occupies three days of David’s week. He is a winemaker for the remaining time. ” Within the next 10 years, I will be a full-time winemaker”, he says. His cuvée “Pinot Noir 2013” is already promising.

Going back to Auckland, we stopped at Mission Estate, in Hawke’s Bay. Founded in 1851 by Catholic missionaries, this is one of the oldest wineries of New Zealand. « The region is warmer and more suitable for varieties such as Syrah, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon », Steve, the head of viticulture, explained.

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Some coups de cœur for this second part of the trip:
-Trig Hill Riesling 2010, from Rock Ferry
-Chardonnay 2013, from Cloudy Bay
-Home Block Pinot noir 2008, from Margrain Vineyard
-Clos Henri Sauvignon Blanc 2013, from Clos Henri
-Jewelstone Syrah 2013, from Mission Estate

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Waiheke Island, a small paradise

The island of Waiheke is only 30 minutes from Auckland by ferry. A small, lost and preserved corner of paradise with its wild beaches and hippie culture. People live here ‘out of time’. On a stretch of only 19,3 km long, the island has no less than 20+ wineries, such as Te Whau, where Tony Forsyth , a former London sociologist, who moved here for a change of lifestyle lives.

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With a 25% slope and necessary handlabour throughout the vineyard, I am not sure that retirement is an easy one… Whatever, Tony is passionate. « When you love what you do, nothing else matters », he likes to say. His cuvée “Chardonnay 2014” is remarkable.

We ended our stay in Waiheke in apotheosis with a memorable vertical tasting (6) at Te Motu. The program included no less than nine vintages: 2014, 2013, 2012, 2004, 2005, 2006, 1997, 1999 and 1998. 98 and 99, blends of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, are at their peak and of rare finesse. No doubt, we play here in the first league.

Te Motu
The day before leaving, we were invited by Nicolas Goldschmidt – the director of the OIV MSc – to host a joint conference in Auckland – an opportunity to present the project for promotion to the press. A beautiful New Zealand vs France tasting, lead by Gerard Basset followed. The wine world is beautiful when it is shared in this way.

WineExplorers’cheers,
JBA

Thank you to Waimea, Rippon Vineyard, Felton Road, Peregrine Estate, Pegasus Bay, Rock Ferry, Cloudy Bay, Seresin Estate, Clos Henri, Margrain Vineyard, Lynfer Estate, Mission Estate, Te Whau and Te Motu for their warm welcome. Thank you to Nicolas Goldschmidt, director of the OIV MSc, to Gérard Basset and the Glengarry team for this beautiful conference in Auckland. Finally, thank you to Leafyridge for the memorable tasting of olive oils they organized us during our visit to Lynfer Estate.

(1)  For more information : http://www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz/wine-grower/wg-opinion/editorial/an-organic-experience
(2) The 45th parallel South crosses only land on a part of New Zealand and Patagonia. The rest of the parallel only see the ocean.
(3) A anabatic wind is an upward wind of an air mass along a geographical terrain due to the heating of it.
(4) DRC : common abbreviation to evoke the famous Domaine de la Romanée-Conti.
(5) The tarakihi is a local fish and the third most consumed in New Zealand.
(6) A vertical tasting is a tasting where you put side by side several vintages of the same wine of the same estate.

For more information on New Zealand wines : http://www.nzwine.com

Tasmania, an island of well-kept treasures

Being the only island State of Australia, Tasmania is a fascinating and intriguing wine region. According to the legend, this little island in the middle of the ocean was born from the union between Australia and New Zealand.

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As a child, I imagined this to be a hostile wilderness, inhabited by dangerous animals… This can be blamed on the cartoons featuring the famous “Tasmanian devil” I guess.
It is isolated from the mainland only by the rushing waters of the Bass Strait, yet it seems to be a world apart. We decided to spend 15 days here to discover its secrets. Rental car ready, we started in the north of the island. Only three hours of driving were needed for us to rally the beaches. Yes, Tasmania is very small!

A high-quality micro-production

The island is beautiful. The passing landscape through the open window of the car varied between rocky plains and forested mountains. Only a few cars crossed our path. It felt like we were (almost) alone. Tasmania has preserved its independence and integrity, while playing the role of benevolent host to perfection. It’s very nice.

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However, the Tasmania wine production is only a drop of water in the Australian wine ocean. Which is undeniably what makes it so charming! With 1,800 hectares of vines, the vineyards represent just 0.5% of the country’s production. Yet, this small production remains one of the most qualitative.
Why such success? Because of a cooler climate! The grapes also ripen two weeks later compared to the mainland. When we arrived in early February, it was hardly veraison. “It is for this reason that Pinot Noir is the king grape of Tasmania”,  Peter Caldwell, director of Dalrymple explained. By itself, it represents 44% of the Tasmanian production. Then Chardonnay (23%), Sauvignon Blanc (12%), Pinot Gris (11%) and Riesling (5%) follow.

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“Production is concentrated to the East and to the Center (1), where wine regions are protected from strong winds and rainfall by a mountain range”, Peter added.
And if per chance you have the opportunity to go to the West of the island, a surprise awaits you: humidity and rain are permanent and make growing grapes impossible. A real rainforest!

The « Méthode Tasmanoise »

The cool and damp climate of Tasmania is suitable to the production of sparkling wines. And they are booming. “I love wet areas like here and I believe it helps to produce the finest sparkling wines”, Andrew Pirie (2), a rising star in the land of Tasmanian bubbles and the owner of domain APOGÉE explained.

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As for Jansz winery – exclusively producing sparkling wines – they even had the great idea to brand the name « Méthode Tasmanoise ». A brilliant marketing initiative and a nod, not without a lot of humor, to the inimitable (3) and very coveted méthode champenoise.

Some heart strokes in sparkling and white wines :
-Cloth Late-Disgorged Sparkling 2004 from Moorilla Estate (64% Pinot Noir, 36% Chardonnay ; aged 10 years on lees)
-Late Disgorged 2006 from Jansz (51% Chardonnay, 49% Pinot Noir)
-Vintage Deluxe Brut 2012 from Apogée
-Chardonnay 2009 from Freycinet
-Cave Block Chardonnay 2012 from Dalrymple
-Riesling 2003 from Freycinet

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We also fell in love with Freycinet, family vineyard since 1979. Claudio, the oenologist – born in Tasmania and whose parents are Italian – produces great wines that age remarkably well. To discover urgently…

Moorilla Estate, a cultural shock

Moorilla Estate is a must visit and was recommend by everybody. Not for its vineyard – although the place is gorgeous and the production of high quality, like the remarkable “CLOTH Late-Disgorged Sparkling 2004” – but for its museum : MONA (Museum of Old and New Art). This is the only real museum of the island.

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A very controversial place, created by David Walsh, the owner of the domain,  whose predilection themes are nothing but death and sex. An rather confusing experience  which annually attracts hundreds of thousands of tourists. Sensitive soul, break away.

Some heart strokes in red wines:
-MUSE Pinot Noir 2012 from Moorilla Estate
-Cabernet/Merlot 2000 from Freycinet
-MON PèRE Syrah 2013 from Glaetzer Dixon
-Young Vine Pinot Noir 2013 from Gala Estate
-Cabernet Sauvignon-Merlot 2008 from Marion’s Vineyard
-Pinot Noir 2012 from Delamere

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Marion’s Vineyard, a unique wine tourism potential

It is impossible to speak of Tasmania without mentioning Marion’s Vineyard. A crazy scene with multiple inspirations, combining sculptures of all kinds, huts in the woods, an outdoor concert stage and even ecological toilets ; all perched on a hill overlooking the lake… No wonder the winery has been the first to open its doors to the public (in 1983) and hosts musical events, concerts and weddings. The place is just magical.

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Cynthea – the daughter of the owners and the director of Beautiful Isle Wine Estate together with her husband David, would love to develop the place further and to make it “the must visit winery »  of the island. But for that, she will need the patriarch to step down. In the mean time, we tested a night in a cabin in the woods in the company of raccoons. Change of scenery.

As good disciples of Epicurus, we ended our stay with a Whisky parenthesis. The Nant Distillery – one of the five distilleries in Tasmania – opened its doors to us for a visit and a tasting.

The Nant Distillery

The Nant Distillery


We learned for example that 500kg of malt are needed to produce 200 liters of spirits. Another good reason to appreciate the true value of these timeless nectars, like The Old Mill Reserve cuvée, aged in casks of Sherry and Bourbon.

WineExplorers’cheers,
JBA

Thank you to Dalrymple, Jansz, Apogée, Delamere, Marion’s Vineyard, Beautiful Isle, Stoney Rise, Devil’s Corner, Freycinet, Gala Estate, Glaetzer Dixon, Moorilla and The Nant Distillery for their warm welcome.

(1) The majority of Tasmanian grapes are grown in the regions of Tamar Valley (40%), East Coast (20%), Pipers River (northeast) which produces about 19%, Coal River Valley (13%) . Other regions included Derwent Valley, the North West and Huon/Channel.
 (2) Andrew Pirie is an agricultural engineer and holds a PhD in viticulture and study of Australian climates.
(3) The Champagne method is inimitable since the designation ‘méthode champenoise’ may be used only for wines originating in Champagne. However, the method is similar to traditional method, ie the second fermentationis done in the bottle.

For more information about the Tasmanian wines : http://winetasmania.com.au

 

1st Wine Explorers’ world wine tasting…

“Exceptional guests for a unique journey around the world of wine“

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On June 16, seven professionals from the wine industry did us the honor of joining the WINE Explorers’ team, in order to share the discoveries of the first part of the trip, which began in January 2014. A unique tasting, where 12 countries were represented, as that we are very happy to share with you today!
A complicated choice because after a year and a half of peregrinations and 180,000 kilometers traveled, over 2,250 wines had been tasted and listed.
 Some wines were tasted conventionally while others were served blind, to give some surprises to a public of connoisseurs.
The idea was not to judge these wines, but to assess the potential of each of the selected wine regions and discuss the notion of terroir.

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They attended the tasting  : Patrick Schmitt MW, editor in chief of The Drinks Business (UK), Debra Meiburg MW, consultant (Hong Kong), Jean-Claude BerrouetSandrine Garbay, cellar master of Château d’Yquem, Thomas Duroux, CEO of Château Palmer, Stéphane Derenoncourt and Rachid Drissi, purchasing manager of the prestigious negotiant Duclot.

24 wines from 12 countries were tasted

DRY WHITE WINES
Kristall Kellerei, 2013, Rüppel’s Parrot Colombard, NAMIBIA
Aruga Branca Pipa, 2009, Katsunuma Jozo Winery, JAPAN
Virtude Chardonnay, 2013, Salton, BRAZIL
Skyline of Gobi Chardonnay Reserve, 2013, Tiansai Winery, CHINA
Tasya’s Chardonnay, 2011, Grace Vineyard, CHINA

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RED WINES
Pinto Bandeira Pinot Noir, 2014, Vinícola Aurora, BRAZIL
Nouveau, 2013, Château Mani, SOUTH KOREA
Cuvée prestige, 2014, Castel, ETHIOPIA
Grande Vindima Merlot, 2008, Lidio Carraro, BRAZIL
Don Manuel Petit Verdot, 2013, Tacama, PERU
RPF Tannat, 2011, Pisano, URUGUAY
Don Manuel Tannat, 2012, Tacama, PERU
Juan Cruz Tannat, 2012, Aranjuez, BOLIVIA
Cuvée Ameena Syrah, 2010, D’Orrance Wines, SOUTH AFRICA
Cuvée Violette, 2012, Le Vieux Pin, CANADA
Emma’s Reserve, 2012, Silver Heights, CHINA
Kerubiel, 2005, Adobe Guadalupe, MEXICO
5 Estrellas, 2009, Casa de Piedra, MEXICO
Le Grand Vin, 2012, Osoyoos Larose, CANADA
Ensemble Arenal, 2010, Casa de Piedra, MEXICO
Raizes Corte, 2010, Casa Valduga, BRAZIL

SWEET WHITE WINES
Vendange Tardive, 2012, Vignoble du Marathonien, CANADA
Vin de Glace, 2011, Vignoble de l’Orpailleur, CANADA
Tomi Noble d’Or, 1997, Suntory Tomi no Oka Winery, JAPAN

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TOP 3 OF THE JURY – WHITE

1Aruga Branca Pipa, 2009, Katsunuma Jozo Winery, JAPAN
(100% Koshu, 6 months in French oak, then 2 years in bottle)
” Bright wine, slightly gold. Nose of vanilla and acacia ; even more complex after opening, slightly smoky. Mouth with a round, smooth and fresh attack. Very delicate and subtle ”
Food & wine pairing : fish and beurre-blanc sauce

2Virtude Chardonnay, 2013, Salton, BRAZIL
(100% Chardonnay, 6 months in French and American barrels)
” Beautiful clarity, light yellow color. Fresh nose with some floral notes. On the palate a pleasant acidity and an interesting balance. The volume comes from the grape. A wine that displays some personality ”
Food & wine pairing : fresh tagliatelle with salmon

3Vendange Tardive, 2012, Vignoble du Marathonien, CANADA
(100% Vidal, noble rot, slow cold pressing)
” Intense gold color. Pretty nose, deep, notes of pineapple, apricot and mango. Smooth in mouth, with candied peach and apricot. Beautiful wine, dense, rich and sweet but still harmonious ”
Food & wine pairing : vanilla ice cream and hazelnut feuillantine

Two other wines also got the attention of our jury…
- Rüppel’s Parrot Colombard, 2013, Kristall Kellerei, NAMIBIA
(95 % Colombard, 5% Sauvignon Blanc/Chenin)
A very aromatic wine, light and pleasant… that seduced by its “drinkability “.
-Tomi Noble d’Or, 1997, Suntory Tomi no Oka Winery, JAPAN
(100% Riesling, noble rot)
Undoubtedly an unusual wine…

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TOP 5 OF THE JURY – RED

1Cuvée Violette, 2012, Le Vieux Pin, CANADA
(100% Syrah, 14 months in barrels with 19% new)
” Intense deep red color. Green pepper notes on the nose with herbs, olives and blackcurrant. Beautiful mouth, slightly herbaceous with a tapenade and red berries profile. Nice tannins, light oak and very good length. A wine full of elegance and finesse ”
Food & wine pairing : veal chop

25 Estrellas, 2009, Casa de Piedra, MEXICO
(Blend of Tempranillo, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache and Cinsault, aged for 12 months in French and American barrels)
” Complex and earthy nose. Black olive, plum. Mouth well structured, balanced and harmonious. Good length with an aromatic finish. A wine with lot of finesse ”
Food & wine pairing : chili con carne

3Kerubiel, 2005, Adobe Guadalupe, MEXICO
(38% Syrah, 16% Cinsault, 16% Grenache, 6% Tempranillo, 3% Viognier)
” Garnet color, early evolution. Intense nose of jammy fruit (plum, strawberry, gooseberry). Very nice, evokes childhood. Mouth also on black and ripe fruit. Beautiful and dense structure in mouth. Seductive and very well made ”
Food & wine pairing : sautéed veal and wild rice

4Le Grand Vin, 2012, Osoyoos Larose, CANADA
(50% Merlot, 24% Cabernet Sauvignon, 13% Petit Verdot, 9% Cabernet Franc and 4% Malbec, 20 months in French oak barrels with 60% new and 40% of one wine)
” Nose of spices and wild herbs (rosemary, sage, thyme), combined with ripe black fruits. Round mouth, full, balanced. Elegant and harmonious tannins. Remarkable density and length ”
Food & wine pairing : lamb

5Pinto Bandeira, 2014, Vinícola Aurora, BRAZIL
(100% Pinot Noir, 6 months in French oak barrels)
” Light color, quite dense. Nose of modern Pinot noir, woody, ripe and fruity with notes of blackcurrant. Quite fine. Nice texture on the palate. Precise extraction, long length. Beautiful final ”
Food & wine pairing : white meat or marinated red tuna.

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A few words about the countries presented

ASIA

China : a giant which is just beginning
World’s 5th biggest producer and current largest consumer of red wines, China remains primarily a country of extreme conditions of production, with temperatures ranging up to +40°C in summer to -40°C in winter in many central regions, forcing the vines to be buried each winter. The vines are quickly damaged and it is impossible to keep old vines in many regions. Quite an important problem for the elaboration of super premium wines. However, the size of the country offers many different mosaics of climates and soils, allowing hope for a nice future for a production which is so recent. Some top winemakers, as Emma GAO in Ningxia, have already shown us that it is possible to make some very fine and elegant wines.

South Korea : too much moisture for Vitis vinifera
A unique Korean wine presented during the tasting has helped us to highlight the fact that in very wet cultivated areas (90 to 100 %) – as here in South Korea or in Taiwan, for example – wine production requires the planting of hybrids vines other than Vitis vinifera. This seems to suggest that quality wine production is compromised in regions relatively close to the equator, where the humidity is constant and the cycle of the vine is continuous.

Japan : great elegance in the land of the Rising Sun
Japan is a country with generally difficult weather conditions, with a wet climate. The meticulous care of the vine still allows them to produce some very nice wines, especially from the Koshu, Riesling or Pinot Noir grapes. The tasting has shown that Japan can produce very elegant and aromatic wines, both dry, like the delicious « Aruga Branca Koshu » from Katsunuma, or sweet like the cuvée « Tomi Noble d’Or » from Suntory, a surprising botrytis Riesling (moisture combined with an altitude of over 700 meters here becomes an asset).

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AFRICA

Special mention for South Africa
A terroir already well known by connoisseurs for decades now, this tasting was the confirmation that South Africa can produce magnificent and elegant wines, especially from the Syrah grape variety, as here in the Robertson region with the cuvée « Ameena Syrah » from Dorrance Wines which was unanimously appreciated.

Ethiopia : a country as beautiful and endearing as atypical and confusing
11 million bottles produced per year, including 1 million by the CASTEL winery. Real potential in this wine region located 100 kilometers South of Addis Ababa, the capital. You can find here beautiful poor soils perched at 2,000 meters above sea level, with cool nights that allow the grapes to gently reach nice maturity, especially for red wines. Rainfall, often low, but offset by drip and controlled irrigation (as in Chile or California), allows the plant to receive just enough water. The global impression of the wine tasted is positive, even if it is strongly marked by its aging in new oak barrels. We guess a real potential for this young wine country… to be remembered.

Namibia : a confidential production
This country has only four wineries, less than four hectares each! Located North of South Africa, viticulture remains anecdotal there.

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AMERICAS

Brazil : a real potential
The country opened its borders only 25 years ago and is just beginning to reveal its potential. The region of Serra Gaucha, situated around the 29° parallel South, is already promising, both for sparkling and still wines. A topography which reminds us of Tuscany, a rather temperate climate, plenty of sunshine, a moderate but good altitude (700 meters on average), combined with expertise thanks to the Italian immigration and strong technical investments, promise a bright future for the Brazilian wine industry.

Bolivia, a land full of promises
Wine production exclusively in altitude (1,600 to 2,800 m) is probably the main secret of Bolivia’s success with quality wine production; mainly for red wines. Because despite the semi-tropical location of the country around the 21° and 22° parallel South, the region of Tarija (the country’s main producing region), benefits from drier conditions at over 1,600 meters and has a remarkable terroir, mainly composed of well drained sandy loam soils and schist dating from the Jurassic period.
In many Bolivian wines we found freshness, elegance and some complexity, like during the tasting with the cuvée « Juan Cruz Tannat » from Bodega Arranjuez.

“Coup de Coeur” for Canada
The classification of this first WINE Explorers’ tasting is telling: the Okanagan Valley, in British Columbia, is full of treasures. Near the 49° parallel North, the climate is governed by a coastal mountain range that protects the region from cold and wet depressions swept by the Pacific Ocean, 400 km to the west. The result : a warm and dry climate with annual rainfall of 200 mm and an average temperature of 22°C during spring and summer time. The region produces fantastic red wines, fresh, with beautiful elegance and finesse. Another great discovery – at the other end of the country, some 4,400 km to the East : the sweet white wines of Quebec, from hybrid varieties such as Vidal or Seyval. A very small production offering very nice wines with concentrated aromas, thanks to a cool climate and grapes harvested (very) late by a few irreducible passionate winemakers.

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Mexico : the beautiful surprise
The region of Baja California, South of California, was one of the best surprises of the first WINE Explorers’ tasting. Located on the 31,5° parallel north, this semi-desert region lacks of water (less than 200 mm of rain per year in good years) and does not forgive any approximation. It results in solar wines, powerful and balanced, meticulously blended, combining up to six grape varieties in the same cuvée and show how important it is to consider Mexico as one of the next stars of tomorrow’s new-world red wines.  A nice recognition for a country that was, in 1554, the pioneer of the Americas in terms of viticulture…

Peru, a great terroir
The Ica Valley is the main region of production of the country. The climate is dry and hot. “A bit like Chile“, some said. And even if we are here on the 17° parallel South, this region is suitable for producing wines in exceptional conditions, ” thanks to the characteristics of its unique climate and its alluvial soils”, loved to emphasize great wine figures like Max Rives and Emile Peynaud. At the foothills of the Andes, red wines made from Petit Verdot and Tannat grapes can give very good results.

Uruguay, to follow very closely
Despite a fairly dense and rather concentrated annual rainfall, very conscientious wineries know how to produce very nice wines, especially red, with rather early varieties such as merlot, or other less early as tannat. It is the case of the Pisano winery for example, which benefits from clay and limestone soils with very high pH (7.5 to 8), giving mineral and complex wines. In the land of meat lovers (52 kg consumed per year per capita !), wine knows how to find its place with style.

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THE FINAL WORD

All regions of the world are not conducive to viticulture. Yet, many factors such as soils, altitude, climate, grape variety or climat can create special conditions for the production of very nice wines. A protective mountain barrier, a South-facing hillside… are sometimes the ingredients for an elegant and complex wine. However, what can make each of these wines some ‘great’ wines is above all the skill of the winemaker and his meticulous knowledge of its terroir.
Understanding a terroir is adapting its cultivating system, choosing the appropriate plant material, making the right choices in the vineyard and in the winery. Jean-Claude Berrouet reminded us during this first tasting of this wise definition of terroir, given by Olivier De Serres in the 17th century and which aptly illustrates this final word : ” Air, land and complant are the foundation of the vineyard“. Let us not forget that.

The conclusions of this first WINE Explorers’ tasting still remain relative because unfortunately we do not have the chance to visit all wineries of the countries we explored (it would take although 10 generations of explorers to try to visit them all!). And as we all have a different palate, it is possible that we sometimes lacked objectivity. That is why it was very important for us to be surrounded by leading experts in the world of wine, with various backgrounds and experiences, to balance the impressions that we had when tasting these wines the first time.

This experience remains primarily a humbling lesson and of open-mindedness, for wines sometimes “outside of the usual standards” but with an undeniable potential and personality. We will renew it with joy next year!

The world of wine is far from having revealed all its secrets…

WineExplorers’cheers,
Amandine Fabre & Jean-Baptiste Ancelot


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS :
We thank our partners to believe and follow this project : the VIDELOT Group, DB Schenker, Château Lafon Rochet, Château Calon Ségur, Château La Conseillante.
Thank you to Elisabeth Jaubert, Ariane Khaida and Jean Moueix for having made this tasting possible.
And thank you to all the people close to the project and who encourage us every day.