Germany, a nice place to drink

Having said goodbye to Sweden, we left the cool Scandinavian days for Germany, where a few atypical producers were expecting us.
We opted for a ferry trip by night. Departure at 23:30 from Trelleborg. Arrival early morning at Rostock. Allowing 6 to 7 hours of voyage for an average price of €69 per person (camper van included) (1). An inexpensive but adventurous option if you wish to sleep and don’t have sea legs!

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The Ahr Valley, a paradise for Pinot Noir

After having recharged our batteries in Cologne for the weekend at my cousin Amelie’s place, we took the direction of the Ahr Valley, one of Germany’s smallest wine regions, with barely 558 hectares planted (2).
And although Germany is known for its (legendary) Riesling wines, red varieties are king here (3)! Especially Spätburgunder (4). How is this possible? Through a unique microclimate. This tribute of the Rhine, mainly composed of slate – a metamorphic rock that stores heat – takes advantage of south-facing slopes, flooded with sun, for the delight of Pinot Noir.
As a result : fine wines, with freshness and delicate tannins, like those of J. J. Adeneuer estate in Ahrweiler.

Riesling, a white wine with aromas of… petroleum

If I had to choose three wines to take with me on a desert island, I would definitely take a bottle of German Riesling in my cooler!

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Because Riesling has thousand flavors and countless profiles, making its exploration infinite. From dry to sweet, moderately dry to very sweet, sometimes effervescent, sometimes botrytized, often partially fermented (when residual sugars remain), it never ceases to surprise and can match with all the moments of life. To make it short and as you already understood : I am a huge fan of this varietal!
Our next destination was the famous Rheingau region with the aim of unravelling the mysteries of Riesling. A grape variety that apparently develops aromas of “oil” with age, we were told at Georg Breuer winery. The estate is known to store an impressive amount of old vintages in its cellar.

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Perceived as a fault in young wines by some people and as quality in old vintages by others, the famous parfume of petroleum in Riesling always makes debate. Personally, it bewitch me. In conclusion, taste some of these great wines by yourself and ask youself the question : do I find it pleasant or not? Nobody will say it better than you.

In Rheingau, better not get dizzy!

Only 30 000 years ago, the sea was still present in this part of the world. As a testimony, it left soils rich in minerals and sediments, as well as beautiful and breathtaking vineyards along the Rhine, with such steep and rocky slopes that you sometimes need a rope in order not to fall!
“That’s what makes the charm and uniqueness of our wines”, Moritz Nagel, marketing director of Schloss Vollrads, a castle from the early seventeenth century with which we fell in love, explained.

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In addition to 80 hectares planted exclusively with Riesling, Schloss Vollrads holds treasures, like the oldest archives of German wine sales, dating back to 1211. As well as a room with walls covered by leather and gold inserts (only two rooms like this one exist in the world, including a smaller one in Cordoba, Spain).
An estate worth visiting, where you can taste much of the wine range at the cellar door, and even watch bats at nightfall, in order to discover their beneficial impact on the local ecosystem.

Some German wines to discover :
Kerner Spätlese 2014, from Weingut Klös
Riesling Alte Reben 2005, from Schloss Vollrads
Riesling Berg Schlossberg Auslese 2010, from Georg Breuer
Trockenbeerenauslese 2010, from Schloss Vollrads
Pinot Noir Kräuterberg VDP–Grosses Gewächs 2011, from Weingut Adenauer

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Weingut Klös, the Tom Thumb of the Rheinhessen

Even if the Rheinhessen is known to be the largest German wine producing region (5), our friend Helanie (winemaker in South Africa and our first great meeting in the project!) highly recommended exploring Weingut Klös winery. Here we met with Matthias and Simone Klös, a brother and sister team against the current of the region, making a very interesting production from the 3-hectare family estate.
Simone, a consultant for thirty vineyards in the region, explained the importance of her job in her analyzes laboratory to us. “The apprentice chemist side of wine doesn’t always receive good press, yet it is fundamental in order to deliver a faultless and stable finished product to the consumer”. Only one rule : hygiene. I even learned to de-scale tanks with Simone. Except that I wasn’t fast enough… and was rightly scolded. Don’t mess with cleanliness!

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The lesson completed, Simone took us discovering the “Hohlweg”, these traditional roads located between two slopes – usually planted with trees – linking the agricultural plots to villages, hamlets and farms. Narrow and difficult to access for agricultural machines, these paths are preserved as cultural heritage, as they have played a major role protecting both soldiers and the population during the Second World War.

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In conclusion of our German trip, we were invited to sit in the panoramic cockpit of a huge Ero grapeliner 6175, to attend the mechanical harvest of Klös’s neighbour. Literally stepping over the vine row, the machine demonstrated an impressive dexterity. First it shook the vines, then separated the leaves and the stalks of the berries, collecting them in a separate bin. All this with an average speed of 3.7 km/h. Bluffing…

WineExplorers’cheers,
JBA

 

Thank you to Weingut Adeneuer, Schloss Vollrads, Georg Breuer and Weingut Klös for having warmly received us. And a special thank you to Amélie Boudin, Moritz Nagel and the Klös family for their delicate hospitality.

(1) For more information on ferry lines crossings Sweden and Germany : http://www.directferries.fr/?_ga=1.236306113.1730865352.1472560082
(2) With only 558 hectares of vines planted for a global area of 102,000 hectares, the Ahr valley accounts for only 0.5% of German vineyards. Source: Sud de France.
(3) Germany now has 40% of red wine in its annual production; with about a third made from Pinot Noir.
(4) Spätburgunder is the German name for Pinot Noir
(5) Rheinhessen (or Hesse-Rhineland in French), is the biggest German wine region with 26,000 hectares of vineyards. 

A Grand Annual Tasting 2016 full of surprises!

Back from a second year of exploration of the wine planet, suitcases full of bottles –  one more intriguing than the other – we were impatient to share our discoveries with 120 fine wine connoisseurs!

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It was a difficult choice for the selection, with a final list of 35 wines from 14 countries (1). True heart strokes for some wines, nice curiosities coming from climates both extreme and diverse, each wine tasted on June 13, deserves special attention for its quality and unique personality.
To follow is the summary of a tasting far away from the beaten tracks, organized on the beautiful terrace of Duclot-La Vinicole.

(Northern) Europe seduces with the freshness of its wines

A Swedish white wine on top of the ranking, followed by a Belgian wine, was the first highlight of the tasting!
Made from interspecific varieties (cf. PIWI) – 100% Solaris for Hällåkra Vingard in Sweden and 100% Mossiat for the Belgium Château de Bioul – these wines have “seduced with their freshness and surprised with their aromatic potential”. And although these new varieties (still unknown to the general public), can sometimes lack complexity, they could – thanks to their high resistance to cold – rapidly become the future solution for “Northern” climates, where harsh winters and a lack of sunshine make the production of Vitis vinifera wines (very) complicated.

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Speaking about red wines, Slovakia and Austria are two European nations to follow closely. The Slovak “Cuvée 2012” from Mrva & Stanko (made of 4 indigenous varietals: Hron/Vah/Rimava/Rudava) & 100% Blaufraenkisch “Alte Reben 2011” from J. Heinrich have been described as “providing immediate pleasure with a lot of finesse and an elegant and complex tannic structure”.

TOP 5 – WHITE WINES
1 – Sweden : “Solaris 2014“, from Hällåkra Vingård
2 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Muskotály Réserve 2003“, from Château Dereszla
3 – Indonesia (Bali) : “Aga White 2016“, from Hatten Wines
4 – Belgium (Côtes de Sambre et Meuse) : “Mossiat 2014“, from Château de Bioul
5 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Tokaj Szamorodni Sec 2007“, from Samuel Tinon

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Exotic destinations in front of the scene

Who would have believed it?… Two Balinese wines on the podium: undoubtedly the biggest surprise of the tasting!
Imagine Bali (the only wine region of Indonesia): a tropical country where one can harvest up to 3 times a year, where the vineyard has no dormancy period, where it is never less than 23 ° C in winter and where the vines do not live more than 12 years, because of incessant labor…
Yet the wines “made in Bali” have astonished many guests. Described as “very aromatic, pleasant on the palate and with a certain freshness”, these wines showed that with suitable grape varieties (here Belgia and Muscat St Vallier), advanced technology and specific expertise, it is technically possible to make good wines here.

The top 50 studios pics of the tasting !

The top 50 studios pics of the tasting !


As for Brazil, an increasingly recognized destination, with varied climates (equatorial in the north, continental-temperate in the south), it is a country where great “terroirs“ are emerging. As in the Valle dos Vinhedos in the south, where the “Quorum 2006” from Lidio Carraro (40% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Tannat, 15% Cabernet Franc) was unanimously recognized as incredibely elegante.

The production of sparkling wines of high quality is booming worldwide

Germany, England, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Hungary… all these countries have something in common: they play in the big leagues in terms of production of sparkling wines.
Blind tasted around a game that consisted of finding the country of origin (not that easy…), seven sparkling wines, all from different countries, have literally amazed our guests!

JBA with John Leroy, winemaker @ Ruffus Estate (Belgium)

JBA with John Leroy, winemaker @ Ruffus Estate (Belgium)


In fact, more and more wineries, located in regions of the world with suitable terroirs – predominantly calcareous/chalky soils and cool/temperate climates – prove that with suitable varieties, grapes harvested with good maturity, using the traditional method (2) and with long and rigorous ageing, it is possible to produce fantastic bubbles around the world – able to compete with the French production, for example.
Even Bali moved up on the podium with it’s Moscato d’Bali from Sababay, an aromatic and slightly sweet sparkling wine.

TOP 3 – SPARKLING WINES
1-Belgium (Wallonie) : “Cuvée Franco Dragone 2011“, from Ruffus
2 – Brazil (Serra Gaucha) : “Terroir Nature – SAFRA 2009“, from Cave Geisse
3 – Indonesia (Bali) : “Moscato d’Bali 2015“, from Sababay
Special mention : England (Kent) : “Blanc de Blancs 2010“, from Gusbourne

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[NB : congratulations to Paul Dunleavy, from Te Motu (NZ), the only guest at the blind tasting who identified the origins of the 7 sparkling wines!]

Hungary honored and present in all categories

Hungary was in all conversations on 13 June. First with the famous Tokaj region and its sweet wines : 260g of residual sugar for the delicious “Muskotály Réserve 2003“ from Château Dereszla of which remained not a single drop!
But also with dry white wine, like the amazing “Szamorodni Sec 2007” from Samuel Tinon : a wine made from botrytis grapes, fermented in open tanks without residual sugar (unique in the world)… a wine of meditation.

THE TEAM !!

THE TEAM !!


Lesser known than other Hungarian wine regions, Etyek-Buda (25 minutes west of Budapest), with its mild continental climate, turned towards the production of juicy Pinot Noir wines in recent years. A nice example : the “Pinot Noir 2013“ from Etyeki Kuria – n°1 red wine of the tasting. Again, a nice surprise!

TOP 5 – RED WINES
1 – Hungary (Etyek-Buda) : “Pinot Noir 2013“, from Etyeki Kuria
2 – New Zealand (Waiheke Island) : “Bordeaux Blend 1999“, from Te Motu
3 – Australia (Tasmania) : “Cab. Sauvignon/Merlot 2000“, from Freycinet
4 – Brazil (Serra Gaucha) : “Quorum 2006“, from Lidio Carraro
5 – Austria (Burgenland) : “Alte Reben 2011“, from J. Heinrich
Special mention : 
 “Cuvée 2012“, from Mrva & Stanko – Slovakia

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Oceania never ceases to surprise

We all agree, Australia and New Zealand don’t have to gain one’s spurs.
However, two regions particularly intrigued us by their cool climate, particularly suitable for the production of long ageing “Bordeaux style“ wines:
-Tasmania (South of Australia), with the “Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot 2000“, from Freycinet Winery, a model of elegance and freshness ;
-and Waiheke Island, in New Zealand (near Auckland), where the “Bordeaux Blend 1999” from Te Motu (60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, 10% Cabernet Franc), 2nd on the podium and WINE EXPLORERS’ Heart Stroke, impressed with its vitality and youthfulness.
Finally, our guests said they tasted some of the most finest Syrah from Hawke’s Bay (north of New Zealand), home of real Syrah gems like the great “Jewelstone Syrah 2013” from Mission Estate, as well as from Australia, with  “Syrahmi Dreams… 2012“ from Adam Foster and “Basket Press Shiraz 2011“ from Rockford Wines, without forgetting a legendary Grenache, with “The Tri-Centenary 2008“ from Yalumba.

The wine planet (still) remains to be discovered…

WineExplorers’cheers,
Amandine Fabre & Jean-Baptiste Ancelot

 

Thank you to Jean-Luc Lavatine and the team of Duclot-La Vinicole for having made available this beautiful place for our Annual Tasting.
Thank you to all producers for having participated in this event by offering us the wines. We were also very touched by the presence in Paris, on June 13, of some wineries which came to support the event : Hatten Wines (Bali), Ruffus (Belgium), Sababay (Bali), J. Heinrich (Austria), Te Motu (New Zealand) and the Château de Bioul.
Finally, a huge thank you to everyone who participated in the success of this beautiful evening : Catherine Ancelot-Savignac (who also prepared a wonderful buffet!), Prune Meunier, Ode Coyac, Alexandra Schneider, Clara Laurent, Victory Dauviau ; as well as Amandine Fabre, Ludovic Pollet and Stephane Diné from the WINE Explorers’ team.
 

(1) Complete list of the 35 wines presented on June 13 for the Grand Annual Tasting :
1 – Indonesia (Bali) : “Aga White 2016“, from Hatten Wines – Bali
2 – Belgium (Côtes de Sambre et Meuse) : “Mossiat 2014“, from Château de Bioul
3 – Sweden (Skåne) : “Solaris 2014“, from Hällåkra Vingård
4 – Belgium (Heuvelland) : “Pinot 2015“, from Entre Deux Monts
5 – Switzerland (Mont-sur-Rolle) : “Clos du Couvent 2009“, from Domaine de Maison Blanche
6 – Austria (Wachau) : “Smaragd Singerriedel 2014“, from Domäne Wachau
7 – Czech Republic (Moravia) : “Sonberk Riesling V.O.C. 2013“, from SONBERK
8 – Australia (Eden Valley) : “Heggies Vineyard Riesling 2005“, from Heggies Vineyard (Yalumba)
9 – Germany (Rheingau) : “Riesling Alte Reben QBA trocken 2005“, from SCHLOSS VOLLRADS
10 – Australia (Tasmania) : “Freycinet Riesling 2003“, from Freycinet Vineyard
11 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Furmint Sparkling Wine 2011“, from Gróf Degenfeld
12 – England (Kent) : “Blanc de Blancs 2010“, from Gusbourne
13 – Brazil (Serra Gaucha) : “Terroir Nature – cuvée SAFRA 2009“, from Cave Geisse
14 – Belgium (Wallonie) : “Cuvée Franco Dragone Prestige 2011“, from Ruffus
15 – Germany (Rheingau) : “Riesling Sekt Extra Brut 2003“, from SCHLOSS VOLLRADS
16 – Indonesia (Bali) : “Moscato d’Bali 2015“, from Sababay Winery
17 – Australia (Barossa) : “Sparkling Black Shiraz NV“, from Rockford Wines
18 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Kabar 2013“, from Chateau Dereszla
19 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Tokaj Szamorodni Sec 2007“, from Samuel Tinon
20 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Tokaji Aszú 6 Puttonyos 2008“, from Gróf Degenfeld
21 – Hungary (Tokaj) : “Muskotály Réserve 2003“, from Vinotéka Dereszla
22 – Denmark : “Utopia Rondo 2006“, from Kelleris Vin
23 – Austria (Burgenland) : “Alte Reben 2011“, from Weingut Heinrich
24 – Hungary (Sopron) : “Kékfrankos 2013“, from Etyeki Kúria Winery
25 – Austria (Burgenland) : “St. Laurent Schafleiten 2013“, from Judith Beck
26 – Slovakia : “Cuvée 2012 (Hron/Váh/Rimava/Rudava)“, from Víno Mrva & Stanko
27 – Brazil (Serra Gaucha) : “Quorum 2006“, from Lidio Carraro
28 – New Zealand (Waiheke Island) : “Bordeaux Blend 1999“, from Te Motu
29 : Australia (Tasmania) : “Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot 2000“, from Freycinet Winery
30 – Slovakia : “Pinot Noir 2013“, from Víno Tajna
31 – Hungary (Etyek-Buda) : “Pinot Noir 2013“, from Etyeki Kuria Winery
32 – Australia (Barossa) : “Tricentenary Grenache 2008“, from Yalumba
33 – New Zealand (Hawke’s Bay) : “Jewelstone Syrah 2013“, from Mission Estate Winery
34 – Australia (Heathcote) : “Dreams…2012“, from Syrahmi Estate (Adam Foster)
35 – Australia (Barossa) : “Basket Press Shiraz 2011“, from Rockford Wines 

(2) The so-called classic way (though not the oldest) to produce sparkling wine is popularly known as the Champagne method or méthode classique which is the official EU designation. The wine is fermented once in the barrel and then undergoes a second fermentation in the bottle.